Auto Accidents and Traumatic Brain Injury

Winston-Salem Auto Accident Attorneys Represent Accident Victims Suffering From Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury, or TBI, is a form of brain injury caused by sudden damage to the brain. Every year at least 1.7 million people suffer traumatic brain injury in the U.S., and TBIs are a contributing factor in about one-third of all injury-related deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Traumatic Brain Injuries and Automobile Accidents

Experts say that over half of all reported traumatic brain injuries are the result of automobile accidents. Trauma to the brain can occur when the skull strikes a stationary object like the steering wheel or windshield. However, the skull may not need to have been penetrated or fractured for a traumatic brain injury to occur. The force of the accident can cause the brain to strike against the hard interior bones of the skull, resulting in bruising of the brain (a contusion) and bleeding that may or may not be visible at the time of the injury.

Symptoms of Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injuries are classified as either mild or moderate to severe, and some of the symptoms exhibited may include:

  • Mild TBI – Fatigue, headaches, visual disturbances, memory loss, inability to concentrate, sleep disturbance, dizziness or loss of balance, irritability, depression, and seizures.
  • Moderate to severe TBI – Loss of consciousness from several minutes to several hours, persistent headache, repeated vomiting, seizures, dilation of one or both pupils, inability to awaken, weakness or numbness in fingers and toes, loss of coordination, profound confusion, slurred speech, and coma.
Contact a North Carolina Auto Accident Attorney Today

If you or someone you love suffered a traumatic brain injury due to another driver’s negligence, contact the North Carolina auto accident attorneys at Nagle & Associates, P.A. online or call (800) 411-1583 to set up your free initial consultation today.

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